Posts tagged ‘lying’

“Emerald Nutter”

In the longstanding tradition of Nutters, including pre-Nutter, post-Nutter, Stockholm Nutter, Nikko-Nutter and Super Nutter, a new brand of Super Nutter evolved from Texas City, Texas on November 15, 2014 and is termed “Emerald Nutter.” An Emerald Nutter, named after pit bull owner Emerald White, is a Super Nutter that sues the victim after her four pit bulls tear through a victim’s fence and rip the victim’s dog to pieces on the victim’s own property then sues the victim for $1 million dollars. You read that correctly.

Even the Psychic Gerbil stumbled on this one, at one point declaring, “Texas nutter stumps Psychic Gerbil!” The Inquisitr has nothing kind to say about Emerald White of Texas City nor do over 7 thousand Yahoo commenters (and still growing). Common responses include, “I had to re-read the story because it just didn’t make sense!” and “Wow. Just wow. The nerve of this chick!” and “What a low life that pitbull owner is” and “This is so OUTRAGEOUS!” and finally, “THINGS LIKE THIS MAKE MY STOMACH TURN!”

Emerald White is the owner of four pit bulls. In October, the dogs got loose and found their way into the yard of Steve Baker. The Bakers owned a beagle named Bailey, who was 10 years old at the time. Bailey never stood a chance when Emerald’s dogs attacked, but now in an unusual twist, she is suing Baker for up to $1 million in damages, according to court documents. The Galveston County Daily News reports that Emerald White claims “she was ‘seriously injured’ after she was ‘unexpectedly and viciously attacked’ when she entered the Baker’s backyard to retrieve her dogs, which had entered through a hole in the mutual fence separating the two properties.” – Inquisitr, Pit Bull Owner Emerald White’s Dogs Killed A Beagle, Now She’s Suing The Victim

An Emerald Nutter trumps a Super Nutter (and a spicy Pit Grifter), but is merely an extension of the Nutter thought process: “Society must be responsible for my decision and choice to own pit bulls — four of them.” After I lose control of my four pit bulls and they chew through your fence and attack and kill your 10-year old dog on your own property (and attack and injure me in the process too), I have the right to sue you for $1 million dollars in damages. That is the thought process of an Emerald Nutter.

Emerald White is right about one thing, she will need a bucket of cash to keep her pit bulls. After the attack, Texas City officials declared all four of her dogs dangerous. The declaration requires White to obtain a secure enclosure for each dog that is at least 6 feet high (with a mechanical locking device), each dog must be registered with the city annually as a dangerous dog, a sign must be posted in White’s yard alerting residents of her dangerous dogs and she must also obtain $100,000 liability insurance on each dog.

pulling-an-emerald-white

Advertisements

“I saw them and they were neglected”

On June 14, 2013, over three months after the pit bull mauling death of little Daxton Borchardt, Michelle Serocki of the Brew City Bully Club private messaged a friend of the little boy’s father on Facebook under the auspices of a “perceived expert” with special knowledge. Serocki deceitfully claimed to Jennifer that she “saw [the pit bulls]” and “they were neglected.” The truth is, as stated in Beyond the Interview – Essay of a Fatal Pit Bull Mauling by DogsBite.org, Michelle Serocki never laid eyes on those dogs, which were euthanized within hours of the deadly mauling on March 6, 2013 in Walworth, Wisconsin.

While Susan was sitting in the ambulance — still in the driveway of her home — she signed the surrender forms allowing authorities to take her dogs. She wanted nothing more to do with the pit bulls she had raised from babies. The two dogs were taken to a private veterinarian and put down in a matter of hours. Susan was still in the emergency room at Mercy when she was told by a police officer that the dogs had been euthanized. Serocki never laid eyes on those pit bulls. – DogsBite.org

See private message conversation in full

10:58am
Michelle Serocki
Hi Jennifer, Just wanted to privately let you know that what I said publically is directly from my heart. I can’t imagine your pain. The dogs that did this were not well cared for though. I saw them and they were neglected – in my professional opionion almost criminally. You and I can have different opinions on how to care for dogs – but by social and veterinary standards these dogs were neglected. When the Boxer killed and ate the child in Washington County 2 springs ago the media called and asked if it was a pit bull. I guess that kid’s life wasn’t as important as Dax’s since she was killed and eaten by a Boxer… The twins in Menomonee Falls that are no longer identical because of a Black Lab – they weren’t important enough to be news worthy either. It’s sick that the media does this OVER AND OVER AND OVER. If my kid ever gets killed by a dog – no matter what breed – I PROMISE YOU it’s going to make the news. I didn’t want to put all this out on FB out of respect for you. I don’t want to argue with you – I’m fairly certain that I won’t change your mind and that’s totally, totally ok. I don’t need to – I just wanted you to know that some of what you’re saying is not correct because I doubt you’re a person that wants to spread out right lies. You’re just a person that is devastated with grief. I’m so sorry again for your loss and your anger. You’ll be in my prayers not just right now and tonight – but for many days to come. Take care, Michelle Serocki Brew City Bully Club

“Unfortunate accident”

Like the terms freak accident and tragic accident used by pit bull owners to deny responsibility after a violent or deadly attack, “unfortunate accident” was recently voiced by Adam Pollack, who runs a pit bull breeding operation from his home, after his three leashed pit bulls attacked a 9-year old boy. The attack occurred as the boy and his mother, Jessyca Petell, were walking into the entrance of a multi-family home in Pittsfield, Massachusetts. Petell said when her son opened the door, “the dogs burst out, dragging him down the steps and continuing a ‘violent, relentless and ruthless’ attack.” The dogs inflicted 35 puncture wounds and a 3-by-3 inch section of the boy’s scalp was torn off.

In 2007, after a felony-filled domestic incident, Adam Pollack was allegedly attacked by one of his pit bulls. He told police officers then, “You guys better shoot that dog or I will.” So the officers shot the pit bull to death. Pollack is currently appealing the order of Pittsfield Police Chief Michael J. Wynn that deems his three current pit bulls vicious after attacking the 9-year old boy. (Owners of pit bulls who are attacked by their dog routinely order officers to shoot it. When their dog attacks an innocent person, pit bull owners like Adam Pollack routinely go through the appeals process to get their maulers back. Notably, while in quarantine after the attack, one of Pollack’s pit bulls had a litter of puppies).

An unfortunate “accident” indicates an “unforeseeable event not caused by misconduct or negligence” yet in this case, Pollack couldn’t even hold onto the dogs’ leashes allowing his animals to violently attack. Pollack blamed his loss of control over his dogs because the little boy “flung open” the door, spooking the dogs. What is unfortunate is that no matter what a judge decides in the upcoming appeals hearing, Pollack still has a round of new pit bull puppies coming back to his home. What is unfortunate is that new victims of Pollack’s pit bulls lie on the horizon. And finally, what is indeed unfortunate is that Pollack is “prime material” to file bankruptcy if sued by the victim’s family to escape liability.

If Pollack is a renter, however, the boy’s family may have hope.

The owners of three pit bulls implicated in the injury of a 9-year-old boy say they feel terrible about the attack, which they characterize as “an unfortunate accident.” – Adam Pollack
Griggs reiterated that the attack was the result of “a bad decision” … “This was an unfortunate accident.” During the trial which lasted four days, DeKalb Solicitor General Sherry Boston portrayed Vaughn as a negligent dog owner. “An accident didn’t happen on March 9, 2010,” Boston said. “A vicious dog attack that was avoidable happened on March 9, 2010,” – Solicitor General Sherry Boston
Owners of a pit bull in Cheyenne have surrendered their pet to the Cheyenne Animal Shelter after it attacked a 10-year-old neighbor a second time within a year. The dog’s co-owner Duane Padilla said Monday it was an “unfortunate accident.” – Duane Padilla
We spoke with the dog’s caretaker, who says she’s being harassed by people through phone calls and emails, calling her a bad mother for keeping a violent dog when she has small children … The dog belonged to her ex-boyfriend and was never fully socialized, she calls it an unfortunate accident. – Caretaker of pit bull
DEXTER CLARK says it was an unfortunate accident in one breath and in another acknowledges that he is the only one who can control the beast and still another implies the victim did something to provoke dog. – Dexter Clark
As stated before, even though unintentional, you entered the other dog’s territory when you entered their room. They protected their owners just as any dog who is worth it’s salt would do… including yours. Neither you, the hotel nor the dogs were at fault. It was an unfortunate accident  – Richie H
Best quote from the comments section of the article: “This is an unfortunate accident, but it could have been any breed of dog. I agree that owners of dogs have a responsibility to train and maintain control of a dog on a leash. However, I also believe that runners and cyclist need have a responsibility for their own safety when they approach a person walking a dog.” – Blogger commenting on Nutter comment
I agree it is an unfortunate accident but the people who own those pit bulls r my aunt and uncle. Those dogs have always been the most loving and well behaved dogs. They have had many pit bulls in over 25 years and have never ran I to any problems. – rbkirtiely

“Isolated incident”

The term “isolated incident” is often used by pit bull advocates after another terrible pit bull mauling dominates media headlines. A Google search of pit bull attack isolated incident shows over 43,000 results, many involving Level 5 maulings (horribly destructive) and DBRFs (Dog Bite-Related Fatalities). The term is used to compartmentalize the countless predictable tragedies caused by centuries of selective breeding for the fighting pit.

The term was recently used by a West Haven animal rescue group to whitewash the death of Neveah Bryant. (“animal rescue groups had been planning Pit Bull Awareness Day … and say the tragedy is an isolated one.”) The compartmentalization strategy is also employed by pit bull owners to avoid dogfighting and selective breeding as the causation of their containment breaking power, deadly bite style and relentless manner of attack.

You can not blame isolated incidents on one breed of dog. Thats like saying a certain race robbed a convenience store and killed the clerk therefore that whole race is bad. – Janeen Maxwell
Many times, the cities will pass breed bans under the excuse of eliminating dog fighting, but it is almost always in response to isolated incidents of bad pet ownership. – Sarah Sover
Too often today we judge an entire breed for an isolated incident, and Pit Bulls have unfortunately become the most sought after story of all. – Pit bull breeder
This is an isolated incident, there’s something like 34 fatal dog bites a year in this country, this country with perhaps around something like 74 million pet dogs. – Blue
Stories about pit bull attacks are tragic, but isolated incidents. – Random blogger
Dog owners feel it’s not fair to punish an entire breed for an isolated incident. – Pit bull owners
knee-jerk reaction to one isolated incident involving a so-called “Pit Bull Terrier”. – Nick Mays
It’s silly to ban an entire breed based off an isolated incident in the ’80s – Peter Lewis
Afterall one death, as absolutely tragic, appaling and stomach churning as it is, is an isolated incident. – Conners

“I know the family”

To add legitimacy to the claim that the story doesn’t add up after a serious or fatal pit bull mauling, Maul Talkers on mauling threads will sometimes say, “I know the family” and what is being reported is untrue. In dazzling lies — due to the anonymity of most comment sections — a pit nutter may claim that he knows the family (a lie) and claim to be a member of the community (another lie) and that he has “inside information” about the incident that has been sensationalized by the media.

You can believe this. The dogs did not kill John Reynolds. I will not go into the details of his injuries due to respect for the family, but NO dog did the injuries that were inflicted on him. It was most likely the mountain lion that has been spotted in the area. First of all, if the dogs killed him, you would see injuries on the dogs. The video did not show any injuries to the dogs. If the dogs were in a frenzy eating John, then they would have had injuries themselves….
–snip–
We all pay taxes here. We are not that poor. Third, the Missouri Dept. of Conservation keeps saying there are not Mountain Lions living in Missouri. Bull….! They are here. The citizens see them. We all have our stories of spotting them. – IMCROI
The story was originally reported as the dogs being APBT, yes. It also said that the child was a boy. The stories have been amended. They still have not released the official autopsy reports and I am interested to see how they will be spun by the media. Patch — this was not “allowed” to happen. I know the family and know more about this story than what has been released publicly at this time. – forever_pit
Of course, I feel sorry for both families. But I know the family of Rockett, who attacked the little dog. This dog has NEVER done ANYTHING like this before. The dog even lives with 4 other cats in the house. My children have been around this dog. (Brandy, you failed the smell test!) – BrandyWK

“Magical rehabilitation”

Magical rehabilitation describes pit bull owners, rescuers and trainers who claim to quickly “cure” a pit bull — eliminating the dog’s aggressive traits — after a serious mauling. A perfect example of magical rehabilitation occurred after James Harrison’s pit bull, who mauled three people in a single attack (a triple mauler), and within 20 days, was “cured” and ready for adoption by the public.

Somehow between May 30 and June 20 (about 20 days), the triple mauling dog now named Duke has been magically “rehabilitated” by Mary Kay Kain. The animal has gone from being a pit bull to an “American Bandogge Mastiff” and from being a triple mauler to a dog that “loves to sit back in your lap and get belly rubs and kisses on his head.”  – DogsBite.org

“Just a ‘lap dog'”

To emphasize positive traits depicted by pit bulls, Maul Talkers often say that the animal is just a “lap dog”. As an anonymous poster from the Craven Desires blog points out, any dog that wants to be “right on top of you” is possibly displaying dominance, which is “anything but cute or sweet”.

They are wonderful cuddlers and love nothing more than a belly rub. In fact, most pit bulls think they are lap dogs! – Pit bull rescue central
I’m really a lap dogPit bull positive
This breed needs to be taught to sit and greet people calmly as it’s natural inclination will probably be to climb into their lap, put a paw on each of their shoulders, and attempt to wipe their face off with it’s tongue. Attempts to convince a full grown pit bull that it is too big to be a “lap dog” … – Pit bulls on the web
Another behavior that pit nutters constantly rave about is how their dogs just want to be “lap dogs“. “Oh, if you’re sitting down, he just wants to be right on top of you.” No shit, Sherlock. That’s also dominance behavior, and it’s anything but cute or sweet. – Anonymous

“I’m a vet tech”

This phrase is often used by pit bull owners to be seen as an authority when interviewed in news articles or commenting in a mauling thread. 95% of the time, the person is not a “vet tech” (with 2-3 years of accredited training) nor has any training outside of being a pit bull owner. Maul Talkers often take this perceived expert claim further by claiming to be a vet tech for “30 years.” When his or her MySpace or Facebook page is found, however, the person’s age is listed as 25 or younger. Any person who claims to be a “vet tech” when talking about the pit bull issue should quickly be dismissed as a fraud.

I work with all types of dogs as I am certified veterinary technician. When I was in Aurora I worked with quite a few “Pit-bulls” and never came across one that I was scared of until my last day of 2 years at that clinic. I was attacked by several chows, a few labs and one extremely mean Golden (not even mentioning all the chihuahuas, min-pins, shit-zus and countless other small dog breed). – CVT

As a vet tech for 8 years I have had a lot of experience handling dogs who I am unfamiliar with and who are unfamiliar with me. I have had to restrain and perform painful and frightening procedures on all shapes and sizes. When I began in this business I had no experience with pit bulls at all. In the past eight years MANY of the breeds I used to admire have shown me their true and ugly natures and I am no longer a fan. On the flipside I have come to respect and adore the pit bull based on my experiences with them. – Vet Tech

“Perfect storm”

A “perfect storm” is used to describe a hypothetical hurricane that results in the worst possible damage imaginable. Author Sebastian Junger coined the term after learning about the confluence of three different weather-related phenomenon called the “perfect situation.” A “perfect storm” typically strikes once in a century — truly a rare event. We believe Randall Lockwood, a senior vice-president of the ASPCA, was the first to use the term “perfect storm” to describe a fatal pit bull mauling. He did so in a 2006 article by Malcom Gladwell. Lockwood’s presumptions have a basis in fatal pit bull attacks from the 1980s and have little if any relevance today. Further, the rate of fatal pit bull attacks in the United States today occurs on average every 19 days. Hardly once in a century.

“A fatal dog attack is not just a dog bite by a big or aggressive dog,” Lockwood went on. “It is usually a perfect storm of bad human-canine interactions—the wrong dog, the wrong background, the wrong history in the hands of the wrong person in the wrong environmental situation. I’ve been involved in many legal cases involving fatal dog attacks, and, certainly, it’s my impression that these are generally cases where everyone is to blame. You’ve got the unsupervised three-year-old child wandering in the neighborhood killed by a starved, abused dog owned by the dogfighting boyfriend of some woman who doesn’t know where her child is. It’s not old Shep sleeping by the fire who suddenly goes bonkers. Usually there are all kinds of other warning signs.” – Randall Lockwood

After the publication of Gladwell’s piece, other Nutters began using the phrase.

Dr. Randy Lockwood of HSUS called it “…a perfect storm…”, and I have to agree. A fatal dog attack is the result of a conglomeration of many things, all joining up in one perfect storm that goes directly against thousands of years of physical and social evolution.  – Jim Crosby (See: The Crosby Analysis)
She added that the dog’s breed isn’t the most important factor. “Usually it’s a perfect storm situation, with a lot of things that lead up to the attack,” Hetts said. – Suzanne Hetts
Extensive research and investigation has conclusively identified the ownership/management practices that are at the root of the rare, but perfect storm when a dog becomes dangerous. – 00kat00
Pit bulls already are known to be an aggressive breed, and the tethering makes them more defensive of their turf, experts said. “It was a perfect storm,” said Marti Ryan, a spokeswoman for Hillsborough County Animal Services. – Marti Ryan
In many cases, the dogs that end up killing have a history of bites prior to the kill, and in some cases, there are NO prior offenses of aggression and the perfect storm of events has formed and thus, an unexpected bite or fatal bite. – Leigh Siegfried

“Can you identify a pit bull?”

This phrase and its related themes are frequently voiced by Maul Talkers. The gist is that members of the public allegedly cannot identify a pit bull, despite the massive amount of press coverage (yielding 400,000 search results) of the Vick dogs and groups such as Best Friends and Bad Rap continuing to parade these pit bulls in front of the public via TV shows and more. Pit nutters go to elaborate lengths to trick members of the public into believing that they cannot identify a pit bull by creating “Find the Pit Bull” websites as well. A far more realistic Find the Pit Bull Test is located at DogsBite.org.

Variations include: 1.) Do you even know what a pit bull is? 2.) A pit bull is not a breed of dog, and  3.) Would you know a pit bull if you saw one?

pitsanddobs: “3rd Do you even know what a Pit Bull is? Would you recognize one if you saw one? Probably not most people can’t.”
Erik Hess: “First of all, a “Pit Bull” is not a breed of dog…”
Generic Pit Nutter: “If you wouldn’t know a pitbull if you saw one, you’re not alone.”