Posts tagged ‘irrelevant conclusion’

“Unfortunate accident”

Like the terms freak accident and tragic accident used by pit bull owners to deny responsibility after a violent or deadly attack, “unfortunate accident” was recently voiced by Adam Pollack, who runs a pit bull breeding operation from his home, after his three leashed pit bulls attacked a 9-year old boy. The attack occurred as the boy and his mother, Jessyca Petell, were walking into the entrance of a multi-family home in Pittsfield, Massachusetts. Petell said when her son opened the door, “the dogs burst out, dragging him down the steps and continuing a ‘violent, relentless and ruthless’ attack.” The dogs inflicted 35 puncture wounds and a 3-by-3 inch section of the boy’s scalp was torn off.

In 2007, after a felony-filled domestic incident, Adam Pollack was allegedly attacked by one of his pit bulls. He told police officers then, “You guys better shoot that dog or I will.” So the officers shot the pit bull to death. Pollack is currently appealing the order of Pittsfield Police Chief Michael J. Wynn that deems his three current pit bulls vicious after attacking the 9-year old boy. (Owners of pit bulls who are attacked by their dog routinely order officers to shoot it. When their dog attacks an innocent person, pit bull owners like Adam Pollack routinely go through the appeals process to get their maulers back. Notably, while in quarantine after the attack, one of Pollack’s pit bulls had a litter of puppies).

An unfortunate “accident” indicates an “unforeseeable event not caused by misconduct or negligence” yet in this case, Pollack couldn’t even hold onto the dogs’ leashes allowing his animals to violently attack. Pollack blamed his loss of control over his dogs because the little boy “flung open” the door, spooking the dogs. What is unfortunate is that no matter what a judge decides in the upcoming appeals hearing, Pollack still has a round of new pit bull puppies coming back to his home. What is unfortunate is that new victims of Pollack’s pit bulls lie on the horizon. And finally, what is indeed unfortunate is that Pollack is “prime material” to file bankruptcy if sued by the victim’s family to escape liability.

If Pollack is a renter, however, the boy’s family may have hope.

The owners of three pit bulls implicated in the injury of a 9-year-old boy say they feel terrible about the attack, which they characterize as “an unfortunate accident.” – Adam Pollack
Griggs reiterated that the attack was the result of “a bad decision” … “This was an unfortunate accident.” During the trial which lasted four days, DeKalb Solicitor General Sherry Boston portrayed Vaughn as a negligent dog owner. “An accident didn’t happen on March 9, 2010,” Boston said. “A vicious dog attack that was avoidable happened on March 9, 2010,” – Solicitor General Sherry Boston
Owners of a pit bull in Cheyenne have surrendered their pet to the Cheyenne Animal Shelter after it attacked a 10-year-old neighbor a second time within a year. The dog’s co-owner Duane Padilla said Monday it was an “unfortunate accident.” – Duane Padilla
We spoke with the dog’s caretaker, who says she’s being harassed by people through phone calls and emails, calling her a bad mother for keeping a violent dog when she has small children … The dog belonged to her ex-boyfriend and was never fully socialized, she calls it an unfortunate accident. – Caretaker of pit bull
DEXTER CLARK says it was an unfortunate accident in one breath and in another acknowledges that he is the only one who can control the beast and still another implies the victim did something to provoke dog. – Dexter Clark
As stated before, even though unintentional, you entered the other dog’s territory when you entered their room. They protected their owners just as any dog who is worth it’s salt would do… including yours. Neither you, the hotel nor the dogs were at fault. It was an unfortunate accident  – Richie H
Best quote from the comments section of the article: “This is an unfortunate accident, but it could have been any breed of dog. I agree that owners of dogs have a responsibility to train and maintain control of a dog on a leash. However, I also believe that runners and cyclist need have a responsibility for their own safety when they approach a person walking a dog.” – Blogger commenting on Nutter comment
I agree it is an unfortunate accident but the people who own those pit bulls r my aunt and uncle. Those dogs have always been the most loving and well behaved dogs. They have had many pit bulls in over 25 years and have never ran I to any problems. – rbkirtiely

“My dog might lick you to death”

To understand the experience of owning an outlaw dog breed, Tufts Center for Animals and Public Policy did a study on pit bull owners (Managing the Stigma of Outlaw Breeds: A Case Study of Pit Bull Owners). The “sympathetic” researchers found that owners of dangerous dog breeds directly feel the stigma targeted at their breed and resort to various tactics to lessen it. One of the tactics included counterbalancing the pit bull’s “killer” reputation with overwhelming “affection,” such as: “My dog might lick you to death.”

I’ve found little dogs are more snappy… My Shih Tzu would bite you a lot quicker than any of the other dogs, and my bully will lick you to death, or knock you over leaning on you for a scratch…. – Mollie’s Nana
ALL ANIMALS ARE UNPREDICTABLE. IVE OWNED A PITBULL FOR 7 YRS NOW AND THE ONLY THING HE AS EVER DONE IS LICK MY 4 GIRLS TO DEATH AND KNOCK THEM OVER PLAYING. – Nothing2little
So nice to hear there are people who believe that a pitbulls are a special breed and not all vicious and need to be destroyed. I love my pit as if he were my child. I know he will protect me if needed but also realize that he would probably lick to death anyone that got close enough – lizalu
Our pit bull is named “Sweetie” and it fits her perfectly. She has never met a person she didn’t like and try to lick to death. Her wagging tail is the most dangerous part of her – MyTMMO
I have a Red Nosed Pit Bull … my dog has only ever lunged at one person that came at me aggressively, I was startled and she was ready to kill them. Everyone else she may/ has tried to lick to death, but that is all. – Arkguy84

“The REAL story was not told”

“The REAL story” is sometimes seen in mauling threads after an attack, but is more commonly found on nutter boards. The phrase closely resembles another Maul Talk term, “the story doesn’t add up.” For instance, a pit nutter might state, “Of course the REAL story was not told” then goes on to claim special knowledge (such as I know the family) of which there is no way to verify because the poster leaves no verifiable information.

There’s definitely something not being said in this story. Pitbulls do not just go haywire & attack unprovoked, unless they had rabies or were HORRIBLY abused. Get back to us when the “real story” of what happened here is told… – kaycee71
I bet you heard about a story about a young kid getting attacked by a pit. That is what the paper reported. But the real story was They kid was attacked by the other family dog. The pit then attacked the other dog to get it off the kid.!! – Chris
I would like to know what the real story was here! FOR SOME REASON THE PITBULL IS ALWAYS TO BLAME…..I KNOW IN 99.9 PERCENT OF THE CASES IT IS THE OWNER! – Blondie621

“Raised the dog from a puppy”

To evade responsibility after a biting incident, a pit bull owner may say, “I raised the dog from a puppy.” It’s similar to another Maul Talk term, “The dog has never shown aggression before.” Both try to persuade authorities that the dog owner could never have known his dog would attack. The puppy term has added meaning. Pit bulls do not reach maturity until 1.5 to 2 years old. It is at this time when the breed’s aggressive traits kick in. This is also the average age of pit bulls surrendered to shelters by their owners.

The father said he and his family are grieving over the tremendous loss of their child. The father said the family raised the pit bull since it was a puppy and that the dog never showed any signs of aggression toward anyone in their family. – Mark Valentin
Wallis says his neighbor hasn’t apologized for the attack or said anything to him since it happened April 22…When reached by telephone, Hayes declined to comment and hung up. She told the Fort Worth Star-Telegram she had raised the pit bulls since they were puppies and considered them good, lovable pets. – Nancy Hayes
The dog was 5-years old and had been raised by the victim’s father since it was a puppy. In a press conference following the attack, the victim’s uncle, Terrence Lovejoy, urged parents to “get rid” of pit bulls. He also stated that the dog “didn’t growl, didn’t bark,” just walked over and grabbed the child. He described the incident as “a sneak attack on my nephew.” – DogsBite.org

“Dog was never beaten”

Sometimes a pit bull owner will say that his dog was “never beaten” or “neglected” after the animal seriously injures or kills a person. The terms are designed to absolve the dog owner from any responsibility and to counter pit bull factions who argue that pit bulls only attack when the owner has beaten or neglected them. This is an interesting position for a pit bull owner to be in. Once part of the pit bull community, this owner now must fight against pit bull factions who are calling him an abuser in order to protect the breed.

The father said he had raised the dog since the day it was born, and he said it was a very nice and loving dog who was never beaten. – WJXT (Mark Valentin)
Erb described the six pit bulls as “house dogs” that were well cared for and even microchipped for identification. “They were spoiled rotten,” Erb said. “They were not neglected in any way.” – Barbara Erb

“Never shown aggression before”

After a serious of fatal pit bull mauling, the dog’s owner will often say, the dog has “never shown aggression before” to absolve himself from responsibility. After the death of a 3-day old baby, for instance, who was killed by the family’s pit bull, the baby’s father, Mark Valentin, not only used this phrase but another one employed by culpable pit bull owners, “raised the dog from a puppy.” At the time, Valentin was being investigated for child neglect. It must also be noted that Valentin undoubtably promoted the Nanny dog myth before his pit bull — described to the media as “very loving” — killed his son.

The father said that the family “raised the pit bull since it was a puppy” and that the dog “never showed any signs of aggression” towards anyone in their family. The day that police and child protection agencies stop honoring these cliche excuses from pit bull owners, is the day that children will championed instead of buried. – DogsBite.org
The father said the family raised the pit bull since it was a puppy and that the dog never showed any signs of aggression toward anyone in their family. – Mark Valentin
Valentin said that the dog never showed any signs of aggression toward anyone in their family, adding that his 4-year-old son “has never had any problems with this dog.” The father said he had raised the dog since the day it was born, and he said it was a very nice and loving dog who was never beaten. – Mark Valentin

“Perfect storm”

A “perfect storm” is used to describe a hypothetical hurricane that results in the worst possible damage imaginable. Author Sebastian Junger coined the term after learning about the confluence of three different weather-related phenomenon called the “perfect situation.” A “perfect storm” typically strikes once in a century — truly a rare event. We believe Randall Lockwood, a senior vice-president of the ASPCA, was the first to use the term “perfect storm” to describe a fatal pit bull mauling. He did so in a 2006 article by Malcom Gladwell. Lockwood’s presumptions have a basis in fatal pit bull attacks from the 1980s and have little if any relevance today. Further, the rate of fatal pit bull attacks in the United States today occurs on average every 19 days. Hardly once in a century.

“A fatal dog attack is not just a dog bite by a big or aggressive dog,” Lockwood went on. “It is usually a perfect storm of bad human-canine interactions—the wrong dog, the wrong background, the wrong history in the hands of the wrong person in the wrong environmental situation. I’ve been involved in many legal cases involving fatal dog attacks, and, certainly, it’s my impression that these are generally cases where everyone is to blame. You’ve got the unsupervised three-year-old child wandering in the neighborhood killed by a starved, abused dog owned by the dogfighting boyfriend of some woman who doesn’t know where her child is. It’s not old Shep sleeping by the fire who suddenly goes bonkers. Usually there are all kinds of other warning signs.” – Randall Lockwood

After the publication of Gladwell’s piece, other Nutters began using the phrase.

Dr. Randy Lockwood of HSUS called it “…a perfect storm…”, and I have to agree. A fatal dog attack is the result of a conglomeration of many things, all joining up in one perfect storm that goes directly against thousands of years of physical and social evolution.  – Jim Crosby (See: The Crosby Analysis)
She added that the dog’s breed isn’t the most important factor. “Usually it’s a perfect storm situation, with a lot of things that lead up to the attack,” Hetts said. – Suzanne Hetts
Extensive research and investigation has conclusively identified the ownership/management practices that are at the root of the rare, but perfect storm when a dog becomes dangerous. – 00kat00
Pit bulls already are known to be an aggressive breed, and the tethering makes them more defensive of their turf, experts said. “It was a perfect storm,” said Marti Ryan, a spokeswoman for Hillsborough County Animal Services. – Marti Ryan
In many cases, the dogs that end up killing have a history of bites prior to the kill, and in some cases, there are NO prior offenses of aggression and the perfect storm of events has formed and thus, an unexpected bite or fatal bite. – Leigh Siegfried

“Freak accident”

Owners of pit bulls often say after a serious or fatal pit bull attack that it was a “freak accident”. Google News Archives shows clear results of this when typing in the terms: freak accident pit bull. The term has been in continuous use by pit bull owners since 1985, after Wally Robert’s pit bull, named Napoleon, killed Deborah Pernell while she slept. The phrase is a complete denial of responsibility. Such occurrences are neither freak nor accidental when involving pit bulls. The fact that parents of victimized children and police authorities 25-years later still call such attacks “freak accidents” is regrettable and untrue.

It was a freak accident,” she said. The woman, who asked not to be named, said her children have played with the same dog at the Duck Hill Springs home many times before, adding that the dog owner “didn’t raise the dog to be mean or vicious.” – Unnamed neighbor
Rodriguez told the responding officer she had warned Edward Cahill to euthanize the dog, because the dog was violent and unpredictable. But today she says that is not true. –snip — “I don’t want people to think bad of pit bulls,” Rodriguez said. “It was a freak accident. He loved those dogs.” – Blanca Rodriguez
“I think what happened is that she had a ponytail and she reached down to get something and one of the dogs said…” — snip — Klemetti maintains that the dogs had never hurt people before and that the attack was a “freak incident.” – Steve Klemetti
A day after the family’s pit bull fatally attacked his pregnant wife, Greg Napora said Friday he doesn’t blame the dog. He even plans to bury his spouse, Darla, with their pet’s cremated remains in her casket.” –snip– “Whatever happened right now was not the breed’s fault” –snip– “It was just a freak accident.” – Greg Napora
Cook was bitten on his arms, neck, stomach, and leg. Nicholas Michael [Cook] can’t make sense of the attack. “I didn’t train him to fight or nothing, this was a freak accident,” he said. – Nicholas Michael [Cook]
It was a freak accident. It could have happen to anybody she’s [the neighbor] got three kids of her own. It could have happened to one of hers.” – April Sumrall
Hours before being mauled to death by the family pit bull, 12-year- old Nicholas Faibish had been told to stay in the basement … Maureen Faibish, who called The Chronicle on Saturday, trying to make sense of what she called a “freak accident.” – Maureen Faibish
It was just a freak accident that it got loose and went over there and attacked her dog,” says Vincent. “It’s not like Bella did it on purpose. – Jessica Vincent
“She could have bled to death,” he said. “The whole thing was just a freak accident, but what we couldn’t believe was how long it took for the medics to get here.” – John Ogden
Kenneth Smith, the child’s father, called it a “freak accident.” The animal had been chained to a tree but broke loose and lunged through a hole in the yard fence, he said. – Kenneth Smith
Agerson said her dog was friendly, and she was shocked by his action. She said he’s been destroyed … “It was a tragedy — a freak accident,” Agerson said – Tina Agerson

The following is a “real” freak accident:

Woman killed in freak New York lift crush
A woman died in a New York City office building after lift doors dragged her upwards and crushed her.
Officials say the woman, identified as advertising agency employee Suzanne Hart, was attempting to enter the lift when her foot or leg became caught.
The car then quickly rose, dragging her body into the shaft and killing her … The accident happened at 10:00 local time (15:00 GMT), officials said, but medics were unable to reach her body immediately because she became stuck between the first and second floors. BBC News, December 2011

“Dogs had begun scrapping”

This phrase stems from professional whitewasher James Crosby, who left a comment at a DogsBite.org blog post about the fatal attack of Mary Bernal. Crosby not only blames the horrifically violent incident on the victim and the victim’s sister-in-law, he also minimizes the attack by referring to it as the “dogs had begun scrapping”. Thus it’s perfectly normal for a dog scrap to result in one human being killed and another severely injured. Learn more by reading: The Crosby Analysis.

This attack began before the day of the attack. Relatives were visiting for a month and had a small dachshund. The dachshund had received substantial attention, supplanting the dog Taz in many interactions. Just prior to the attack Ms. Bernal had picked up the dachshund because the two dogs had begun scrapping. When Ms. Bernal yelled at Taz and snatched the dachshund away, Taz went after the little dog. Bernal held the dog up and screamed. Taz’s first bite was to Ms. Bernal’s hand, where she was holding the dachshund. Her screaming intensified, triggering further action by Taz. Ms. Bernal went down and Taz continued attacking the screaming, thrashing woman. Ms. Macias stuck the dog repeatedly with a shovel, intensifying the attack. – James Crosby

“The most ‘abused’ breed”

Along with the term, “The most ‘maligned’ breed,” pit bull owners and advocates use the term, “The most ‘abused’ breed” to gain sympathy for pit bulls. The truth is the pit bull is the most abused breed in the world because its entire selective breeding foundation is based on dogfighting, and pit bulls continue to be bred for dogfighting today. The act of dogfighting is horrifically abusive and outlawed in all 50 U.S. states. Maul Talkers, however, will have you believe that every pit bull is born angelic and that it is due to owners’ beating and torturing the animal that it continues to maul and kill human beings and animals at an unmatched rate. Note below that 83% of the human fatalities involved family dogs, not pit bulls that were abused or used in dogfighting by their owners.

Mid Year Results: U.S. Dog Bite Fatalities from January 1 to July 22, 2010
DogsBite.org – Of the 18 fatal dog attacks recorded by DogsBite.org so far in 2010, pit bull type dogs contributed to 67% (12). This is equivalent to a pit bull killing a U.S. citizen every 17 days during this 203-day period. 83% (10) of these incidents involved a family pit bull killing a family member.

According to Google News Archives, usage of the term picked up in the late 1990’s and shot through the roof in 2005. One cannot read a mauling thread without hearing the verbiage echoed throughout. After two loose pit bulls killed William Parker in July 2010, pit bull advocates, owners, and apologists were out in full force to victimize the offending pit bulls who not only killed Parker, but injured four others:

I would bet that most posters would agree that not all pit bulls are vicious. Those dogs who are vicious have been shown no love, starved, and have been repeatedly abused and agitated, so much so, that anyone or anything approaching is seen as a threat. Undoubtedly, that was probably the case in this sad, sad story.
This is by no means a racial or location issue. It is about being a responsible pet owner treating an animal as a pet, not a means for what some sick people call “entertainment.” – illindtenn