Posts tagged ‘far-fetched hypothesis’

“Emerald Nutter”

In the longstanding tradition of Nutters, including pre-Nutter, post-Nutter, Stockholm Nutter, Nikko-Nutter and Super Nutter, a new brand of Super Nutter evolved from Texas City, Texas on November 15, 2014 and is termed “Emerald Nutter.” An Emerald Nutter, named after pit bull owner Emerald White, is a Super Nutter that sues the victim after her four pit bulls tear through a victim’s fence and rip the victim’s dog to pieces on the victim’s own property then sues the victim for $1 million dollars. You read that correctly.

Even the Psychic Gerbil stumbled on this one, at one point declaring, “Texas nutter stumps Psychic Gerbil!” The Inquisitr has nothing kind to say about Emerald White of Texas City nor do over 7 thousand Yahoo commenters (and still growing). Common responses include, “I had to re-read the story because it just didn’t make sense!” and “Wow. Just wow. The nerve of this chick!” and “What a low life that pitbull owner is” and “This is so OUTRAGEOUS!” and finally, “THINGS LIKE THIS MAKE MY STOMACH TURN!”

Emerald White is the owner of four pit bulls. In October, the dogs got loose and found their way into the yard of Steve Baker. The Bakers owned a beagle named Bailey, who was 10 years old at the time. Bailey never stood a chance when Emerald’s dogs attacked, but now in an unusual twist, she is suing Baker for up to $1 million in damages, according to court documents. The Galveston County Daily News reports that Emerald White claims “she was ‘seriously injured’ after she was ‘unexpectedly and viciously attacked’ when she entered the Baker’s backyard to retrieve her dogs, which had entered through a hole in the mutual fence separating the two properties.” – Inquisitr, Pit Bull Owner Emerald White’s Dogs Killed A Beagle, Now She’s Suing The Victim

An Emerald Nutter trumps a Super Nutter (and a spicy Pit Grifter), but is merely an extension of the Nutter thought process: “Society must be responsible for my decision and choice to own pit bulls — four of them.” After I lose control of my four pit bulls and they chew through your fence and attack and kill your 10-year old dog on your own property (and attack and injure me in the process too), I have the right to sue you for $1 million dollars in damages. That is the thought process of an Emerald Nutter.

Emerald White is right about one thing, she will need a bucket of cash to keep her pit bulls. After the attack, Texas City officials declared all four of her dogs dangerous. The declaration requires White to obtain a secure enclosure for each dog that is at least 6 feet high (with a mechanical locking device), each dog must be registered with the city annually as a dangerous dog, a sign must be posted in White’s yard alerting residents of her dangerous dogs and she must also obtain $100,000 liability insurance on each dog.

pulling-an-emerald-white

“Must have been the weather”

Maul Talk reader JoannaDW sends in new phrase after the fatal pit bull mauling of Debra Wilson-Robert. The phrase, “Must have been the weather” has been used before, but in a slightly different context. In February 2010, after a series of brutal pit bull maulings in Philadelphia, including the horrific death of Christine Staab, pit bull propaganda devotee Karen Delise suggested the attacks were caused by the “snowy winter” and “cabin fever.”

This one was inspired by the story told on September 11 about the woman in Jefferson County who was killed by her pet pit bull. Marla Glover, the woman’s friend, actually blamed the attack on a storm that blew over, as if it’s totally normal and expected for domestic animals to suddenly launch a bloody, fatal attack on long-time owners and friends. Most wild animals don’t even do that, but this does not faze the dedicated pit nutter. “Must have been the weather” is the sort of response you give to someone whose allergies or arthritis is acting up, or to someone whose plants have grown twice their original size in a week. It’s not the response you give to someone who was eaten alive by their own pets. – JoannaDW

“Provide a psychoanalysis”

After Tucson TV station KGUN-TV aired a segment about pit bulls, the Nutters unleashed hell on the station’s Facebook page. Then the station got a letter from a local group named “Pit n’ Proud” brimming in Maul Talk (pro-pit bull “spin”), accusations and illogical reasoning. KGUN9 News Director Forrest Carr blasted back with an editorial that no doubt sent the Nutters squealing backward. There are so many good parts within Carr’s response, but the failure of the station to “psychoanalyze” the fatal pit bull mauling of Michael Cook is award winning.

Pit n’ Proud – What is concerning is that no one looked in to why the dog reacted in such a violent manner. To our knowledge, no professionals came in to evaluate the dog’s temperament or its physical and psychological condition, or to interview the families to find out what warning signals or body language they may have missed that could have prevented the attack. This is the vital information that must be reported on to help prevent future occurrences.- Rachel Molyneux and Anthony Holcomb

Carr’s response – Molyneux and Holcomb (of Pit n’ Proud) were also critical that in reporting on the Michael Cook killing, KGUN9 News did not step forward to provide a psychoanalysis of the dog — talking to the family and examining what “warning signals or body language they may have missed that could have prevented the attack.” – Forrest Carr

“They move differently”

The New York Post recently reported that a 28-year old dog owner blamed a senior citizen who was attacked by two rottweilers because elderly people “move differently.” Christie Smythe said, “My dog isn’t always fond of elderly people. They move differently than other people and that seems to set off a reaction.” A quick search on the phrase shows that the Dog Whisperer uses the same rational when describing “kid aggressive canines.”

The truth is that many dogs perceive children differently from the way they see adults. They move differently, walk differently, smell differently, and sound differently. It’s in their nature to react to any energy that to them, seems unbalanced or unstable. – dogwhisperer

“Interspecies dyslexia”

Science whores also use science babble, such as Dr. Nicholas Dodman, director of the Animal Behavior Clinic at Tufts New England Veterinary Medical Center. Dodman apparently treats nasty rottweilers, pit bulls and “slavering German shepherds” with Prozac. According to a 2000 article published in Jewish World Review, Dodman used the term “interspecies dyslexia” in his book, Dogs Behaving Badly, to describe why “bad” dogs bite children.

PSYCHOBABBLE: Nicholas Dodman, author of Dogs Behaving Badly, explains that dogs who bite small children aren’t necessarily vicious. Instead, they are afflicted with “interspecies dyslexia” — ie, an inability to differentiate between genuine threats and humans who are harmless, or from the dog perspective, “pink and ouchy.” – Evan Gahr

“Science whores”

Not the same as perceived experts. These are people who actually have the academic credentials and occupations needed to call themselves scientists. The science whore is willing to twist real scientific facts and findings in order to protect the pit bull. The science whore can be motivated by greed. Wanting to keep making money on the very lucrative dog-talk circuit, s/he sells both soul and credibility for a few dollars. Some might be motivated by fear, since all who speak or publish the truth about the pit bull is subject to an organized smear and bullying campaign.

How to spot a science whore: The science whore can fill an entire book with detailed explanation of how all working breeds have ended up with genetically determined, strongly heritable behavioral characteristics that can’t be trained out of a dog — and then towards the end of the book suddenly denies that this is also true of the pit bull. The science whore either mixes up relevant variables or ignores them altogether. In a discussion about sustained, maiming and killing attacks by dogs large and heavy enough to actually kill an adult human, the science whore will publish an article proclaiming, for example, that ‘dachshunds bite the most‘.

The list includes a great many people with PhDs as well as many publishing academics. It does not include personnel of the ‘National Canine Research Council‘, which is not a scientific organization.

Author and animal behaviorist Alexandra Semyonova (nonlineardogs.com)

“Must have done something wrong”

Maul Talkers frequently use the phrase, “[The victim] must have done something wrong,” after a violent pit bull attack to place the blame onto the victim. After a family Staffy bull, for instance, seriously mauled and injured Alan Edwards’ wife and male friend, he said: “They must have done something wrong and the dog rebelled.” (See: Images of the victims being taken away on stretchers.) Other examples include:

Yeah, yeah, go and say you did nothing but love the dog and it turned on you– I DO NOT believe you. There is something you must have done wrongLying pit nutter
I have been attacked by a dog before, but never has it been from a pit bull or rottweiler or german shepard. These people must have done something to the dog to scare it. – Snowblossom
The pit bull just mauled this tiny pug visciously and the pit bull’s owner couldn’t stop it. It was, again, TERRIFYING. The pug’s owner left clutching her dog which wasn’t moving. The pit bull’s owner said “There must be something wrong with that pug, He must have done something, my dog isn’t like that”. – Redhead

“Perfect storm”

A “perfect storm” is used to describe a hypothetical hurricane that results in the worst possible damage imaginable. Author Sebastian Junger coined the term after learning about the confluence of three different weather-related phenomenon called the “perfect situation.” A “perfect storm” typically strikes once in a century — truly a rare event. We believe Randall Lockwood, a senior vice-president of the ASPCA, was the first to use the term “perfect storm” to describe a fatal pit bull mauling. He did so in a 2006 article by Malcom Gladwell. Lockwood’s presumptions have a basis in fatal pit bull attacks from the 1980s and have little if any relevance today. Further, the rate of fatal pit bull attacks in the United States today occurs on average every 19 days. Hardly once in a century.

“A fatal dog attack is not just a dog bite by a big or aggressive dog,” Lockwood went on. “It is usually a perfect storm of bad human-canine interactions—the wrong dog, the wrong background, the wrong history in the hands of the wrong person in the wrong environmental situation. I’ve been involved in many legal cases involving fatal dog attacks, and, certainly, it’s my impression that these are generally cases where everyone is to blame. You’ve got the unsupervised three-year-old child wandering in the neighborhood killed by a starved, abused dog owned by the dogfighting boyfriend of some woman who doesn’t know where her child is. It’s not old Shep sleeping by the fire who suddenly goes bonkers. Usually there are all kinds of other warning signs.” – Randall Lockwood

After the publication of Gladwell’s piece, other Nutters began using the phrase.

Dr. Randy Lockwood of HSUS called it “…a perfect storm…”, and I have to agree. A fatal dog attack is the result of a conglomeration of many things, all joining up in one perfect storm that goes directly against thousands of years of physical and social evolution.  – Jim Crosby (See: The Crosby Analysis)
She added that the dog’s breed isn’t the most important factor. “Usually it’s a perfect storm situation, with a lot of things that lead up to the attack,” Hetts said. – Suzanne Hetts
Extensive research and investigation has conclusively identified the ownership/management practices that are at the root of the rare, but perfect storm when a dog becomes dangerous. – 00kat00
Pit bulls already are known to be an aggressive breed, and the tethering makes them more defensive of their turf, experts said. “It was a perfect storm,” said Marti Ryan, a spokeswoman for Hillsborough County Animal Services. – Marti Ryan
In many cases, the dogs that end up killing have a history of bites prior to the kill, and in some cases, there are NO prior offenses of aggression and the perfect storm of events has formed and thus, an unexpected bite or fatal bite. – Leigh Siegfried

“Must have been trained to attack”

This statement is often made by Maul Talkers after a horrible pit bull attack. It is used to deny the pit bull’s responsibility and the breed’s genetic history by shifting the blame onto the dog’s owner. The term is also used to victimize pit bulls. What goes notably unmentioned by Maul Talkers are the many disfiguring and deadly pit bull attacks that involve “loving household” pit bulls that were never trained to attack prior to the dog’s berserking incident.

What Little Bear also didn’t know is that the pitbull breed gets a bad rap because of a handful of pitbulls who were either trained to be mean, or not trained correctly. – Nicki Mann
And just becuase criminals take this breed and fight it and make it do terrible things, you want to punish us all? Guess what, get rid of them and the same criminals are going to go after your beloved Labs and Retrievers who can be trained and tortured just as easily to fight… – Anonymous pit nutter
Just another horrible pet “owner” that will continue to tarnish the reputation of a perfectly good dog breed. Ignorant people that have no clue about Pit Bulls or dogs in general will latch onto this to support their xenophobic fear of the dog rather than the stupid owners that mistreat and train their animals to behave poorly. – Fuzzle1
If any dog is trained to fight by (probably by your distant igrorant lowlife realtives) humans, thats what the dog will do. Get it- still HUMANS FAULT. No different then teaching your son to go rob 7-ll and shoot someone. Does that mean the entire human race should be punished because of your stupid family?? – Pit nutter Jen
“We try to keep track of them, and we have very few incidents,” he said. “A lot of them are not because of what breed of dog it is, but how it has been trained.” – Pit nutter police chief

“Freak accident”

Owners of pit bulls often say after a serious or fatal pit bull attack that it was a “freak accident”. Google News Archives shows clear results of this when typing in the terms: freak accident pit bull. The term has been in continuous use by pit bull owners since 1985, after Wally Robert’s pit bull, named Napoleon, killed Deborah Pernell while she slept. The phrase is a complete denial of responsibility. Such occurrences are neither freak nor accidental when involving pit bulls. The fact that parents of victimized children and police authorities 25-years later still call such attacks “freak accidents” is regrettable and untrue.

It was a freak accident,” she said. The woman, who asked not to be named, said her children have played with the same dog at the Duck Hill Springs home many times before, adding that the dog owner “didn’t raise the dog to be mean or vicious.” – Unnamed neighbor
Rodriguez told the responding officer she had warned Edward Cahill to euthanize the dog, because the dog was violent and unpredictable. But today she says that is not true. –snip — “I don’t want people to think bad of pit bulls,” Rodriguez said. “It was a freak accident. He loved those dogs.” – Blanca Rodriguez
“I think what happened is that she had a ponytail and she reached down to get something and one of the dogs said…” — snip — Klemetti maintains that the dogs had never hurt people before and that the attack was a “freak incident.” – Steve Klemetti
A day after the family’s pit bull fatally attacked his pregnant wife, Greg Napora said Friday he doesn’t blame the dog. He even plans to bury his spouse, Darla, with their pet’s cremated remains in her casket.” –snip– “Whatever happened right now was not the breed’s fault” –snip– “It was just a freak accident.” – Greg Napora
Cook was bitten on his arms, neck, stomach, and leg. Nicholas Michael [Cook] can’t make sense of the attack. “I didn’t train him to fight or nothing, this was a freak accident,” he said. – Nicholas Michael [Cook]
It was a freak accident. It could have happen to anybody she’s [the neighbor] got three kids of her own. It could have happened to one of hers.” – April Sumrall
Hours before being mauled to death by the family pit bull, 12-year- old Nicholas Faibish had been told to stay in the basement … Maureen Faibish, who called The Chronicle on Saturday, trying to make sense of what she called a “freak accident.” – Maureen Faibish
It was just a freak accident that it got loose and went over there and attacked her dog,” says Vincent. “It’s not like Bella did it on purpose. – Jessica Vincent
“She could have bled to death,” he said. “The whole thing was just a freak accident, but what we couldn’t believe was how long it took for the medics to get here.” – John Ogden
Kenneth Smith, the child’s father, called it a “freak accident.” The animal had been chained to a tree but broke loose and lunged through a hole in the yard fence, he said. – Kenneth Smith
Agerson said her dog was friendly, and she was shocked by his action. She said he’s been destroyed … “It was a tragedy — a freak accident,” Agerson said – Tina Agerson

The following is a “real” freak accident:

Woman killed in freak New York lift crush
A woman died in a New York City office building after lift doors dragged her upwards and crushed her.
Officials say the woman, identified as advertising agency employee Suzanne Hart, was attempting to enter the lift when her foot or leg became caught.
The car then quickly rose, dragging her body into the shaft and killing her … The accident happened at 10:00 local time (15:00 GMT), officials said, but medics were unable to reach her body immediately because she became stuck between the first and second floors. BBC News, December 2011